Lifeline Screening a simple test to Prevent serious problems


As we get older our risks for diseases increase exspecially over the age of 55. Many of us live by the rule “no symptoms, no problems”. However, that is not always the case. Many diseases start without any symptoms and by the time the symptoms do appear the disease has already reached an advanced stage. Life line is a preventive health screening that can check for problems before a serious illness occurs. Lifeline screenings are available in 48 states and in convinient areas such as churches, civic centers and many more places. Lifeline screenings are done by professional nurses and doctors who use every measure to make sure the screenings are of the highest quality. Lifeline screenings were responsible for diagnosing over 62,000 illnessess last year alone. Learn more about Lifeline Screening at Wikipedia.

There are many steps to preparing for a Lifeline screening. Please be sure to ask about eating for it varies on the type of screening you choose. You must wear loose fitting clothing, preferably a 2 piece out fit. Do not wear any jewelry or any type of lotion. Also if you bring a cell phone you must make sure it is turned off. Depending on the type of tests you choose be prepared to spend a hour or more at the lifeline screening. Once you have arrived your first step will be payment processing and paperwork, Lifeline provides a comfortable waiting area for you to do these things. There will be many procedures done such as blood tests, EKG’s, vital signs, bone density screenings and a few more, depending of the type of screening you have chosen. Be sure when scheduling your tests to asks questions such as what type of tests will be done to fully prepare you for your lifeline screening.

There are several benefits to having the Lifeline screening done, one of which is peace of mine. As we age we began to worry about our health and if we will have such problems such as heart attacks or cancer, a simple Lifeline screening can eliminate those worries and potentially save lives. Many will walk away from the screening with good news and tests showing there is nothing wrong, however some may walk away having had a serious illness spotted and a chance to stop it before real damage is done. Either way, Lifeline Screenings benefit everyone and provide a healthier and happier way of life. Read more:https://patch.com/texas/across-tx/how-lifeline-screening-can-help-you-lead-healthier-longer-life

GETTING TO KNOW DR. MARK HOLTERMAN

Meet Dr. Mark J. Holterman, a professor based in Peoria, Illinois. He has been working at the Illinois College of Medicine University since 2011. Dr. Mark is a pediatric surgeon at Advocate Christ Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Illinois at St. Francis Medical Center. Dr. Mark Holterman maintains membership with various professional organizations such as American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Surgeons. He has dedicated himself in pediatric surgery with his research interests including stem cell therapies, regenerative medicine, and novel cancer treatments.

 

Dr. Mark Holterman studied at the Yale University. Biology was his major and advanced cum laude before he could earn his MD and Ph.D. from Virginia University. Later on, he finished a residency in surgery at Virginia Health Sciences University including a pediatric surgery fellowship at the Medical Center and Children’s Hospital via the Washington University.

 

The Hannah Sunshine Foundation

 

Dr. Mark Holterman is one of the people who helped to establish a non-profit organization namely The Hannah Sunshine Foundation (http://releasefact.com/2017/10/dr-mark-holterman/). This organization focuses on using cellular and regenerative therapies for kids with rare diseases. Three young minds inspired this project, one of them is a 23-year old lady afflicted with SJIA(systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis), Sarah Hughes.

 

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a severe subform of JIA (juvenile idiopathic arthritis). Unlike other kinds of JIA, this condition affects joints and other organs including the lungs, liver, and heart. The condition isn’t common and occurs among 10-20% of all kids having some form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This disease has no cure yet, but the treatment is available.

 

Volunteering with IPSAC-VN

 

Being an accomplished educator, medical researcher, and practitioner, Dr. Mark Holterman splits his time between his roles at the Illinois University and the president of Mariam Global Health to assist patients in different ways (LinkedIn). He offers unconditional support to charitable organizations like the IPSAC-VN (International Pediatric Specialists Alliance for the Children of Vietnam).

 

For IPSAC-VN to manage to provide the much-needed help to healthcare experts in Vietnam, increase care capacity and improve pediatric surgical care access, the organization relies on support from volunteers and donors. Volunteers provide hands-on support by providing training, patient care, lectures as well as surgery at hospitals and medical schools in Vietnam.

More about Dr. Mark Holterman on Twitter and About.me